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Kiribati Fisheries: Community-Based Approaches To Fisheries Management

The Project

Kiribati Fisheries Management About ProjectKiribati Fisheries will involve the creation of a blog mapping the complex network of social relations in the management of community fisheries.

Kiribati is a Pacific nation comprising many tiny atolls. It has a land area of approx. 811 square kilometres and a maritime jurisdiction of 3.5 million square kilometres.

Managing this marine asset, and particularly its fisheries, which are key to life and identity in Kiribati, is a complex and ongoing challenge. It is also the focus of many community, national and regional conservation and development projects.

The goal behind this project is to create a blog that maps the complex network of social relations in the management of community fisheries. It is hoped the blog will contribute new insights into the development of community-based approaches to natural resource management.

The blog will be used as a tool to openly explore tensions between environmental sustainability, development, international fisheries law and local governance. It aims to open up dialogue between Australian and International communities with sustainability and post-colonial challenges and improve methods of intercultural and cross-disciplinary engagement. It will importantly be translated into Kiribati to connect with emergent discoveries with major local stakeholders.  

The Researchers

Kiribati Fisheries Management About ResearchersDr Lucas Ihlein is a lecturer and creative arts researcher in the Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts residing in the School of the Arts, English and Media. He will be the principal author of the blog.  Ihlein's practice-based research on the use of blogging as a form of socially-engaged artmaking (Ihlein, 2010). The project extends his recent work of the intersection between art practice and complex environmental management issues.

Dr Quentin Hanich is a Associate Professor in UOW's Fisheries Governance Program Leader at the Australian National Centre for Ocean Resources and Security (ANCORS).  He will oversee the project.  He has extensive experience in Kiribati in fisheries policy.

Dr Leah Gibbs is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Geography & Sustainable Communities, Faculty of Social Sciences. Her research examines the cultures and politics of nature.

Associate Professor Karen Charlton is a public health nutritionist in the School of Medicine within the Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health. Her expertise lies in the intersection of nutrition and social structures with a special interest in public health and food security.

Dr Aurelie Delisle is a Research Fellow at UOW's Fisheries Governance Program Leader at the Australian National Centre for Ocean Resources and Security (ANCORS).  Her ongoing research focuses on pacific fisheries management.

Brook Campbell is a Research Fellow at UOW's Fisheries Governance Program Leader at the Australian National Centre for Ocean Resources and Security (ANCORS).

Last reviewed: 20 June, 2016

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Sustaining Coastal and Marine Zones

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